Fly Fishing for Huge Arapaima in Guyana with Costa Del Mar

We are pleased to announce that Costa’s Sundance-Award-Winning film Jungle Fish is now available for free viewing.

Jungle Fish cover art

Click the banner above to watch the full length movie now

Watch as a group of anglers attempt to catch an arapaima on a fly for the first time in the jungles of the small South American country of Guyana. If they succeed, the resulting opportunity to host fisherman can save this remote village’s way of life and protect the surrounding pristine rainforest, not to mention this ancient fish. Jungle Fish not only found critical acclaim from the prestigious Sundance Film Festival, it propelled a movement to work with indigenous people to help them create a sustainable livelihood through fly fishing while learning to protect the pristine environments the fish need to live. Other Indifly projects have sprung up around the globe.

Oliver White holds a fly caught arapaima

Oliver White and Shun with an arapaima (photo Credit @jtklugphotography)

Oliver White fighting an arapaima with a fly rod

Oliver White with a giant arapaima (photo Credit @jtklugphotography)

Over head scene of pond in Guyana

Overhead scene of pond in Guyana(photo Credit @jtklugphotography)

An angler fights a jumping arapaima on the fly

Macushi guides Rovin Alvin and Matt Brewer help an angler land an arapaima (photo Credit @jtklugphotography)

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE FILM NOW!

For more information and the best glasses around click the Costa logo below.

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The Mac Attack

We had the pleasure of guiding four consecutive days on the McCloud River with our friends from Cal Trout. We had beautiful conditions with the fringes of fall starting to show and settle in. Wet wading season is over on this river until next year. The october caddis are starting to make appearances and the browns are headed up river to the spawning grounds. Take a minute to watch the clips from the McCloud River but also take a moment and look at CalTrout and learn how you can join in on the fun!

Arguably The Worlds Most Iconic Trout Stream

The mountains are stacked and packed in resplendent white and the lower valley’s are tasting the first flavors of spring as Northern California slowly inches out of the clenches of a truly heavy and wild winter.  Many rivers are still high or too muddy to fish.  But in the months to come that will all change as the weather settles down.  The parched State of California has water for the first time in five years which should make for great fishing and adventures through summer and into the fall season.  With the massive onslaught of precipitation, we have lost the old reliable Lower Sacramento River in Redding to dirty water as Lake Shasta is filled to the brim with muddy water.  It may be a while before it gets back some of its clarity.  When that happens is anybody’s guess, even though the Bureau of Reclamation reports that the water releases out of Keswick Dam will be reduced to 13,900 cfs by Saturday, March 11th.

Our mainstay for guide trips the last month or so, has been the Trinity River.  Although, overall fish numbers have been down compared to previous years, it has been a godsend and has produced fantastic days for our guests.  If we had to choose a bunch of fish with a bunch of fisherman or fewer fish with fewer anglers, we choose the latter.  To be honest, fishing has been challenging on the Trinity some days, but its been real steelhead fishing, giving us opportunity to teach our craft and do things differently. It has been a welcomed change.  The Trinity River looks to be the best option for float trips this March, which is one of our favorite months over there.  It is truly a magic time as insect hatches increase and spring starts to pop.  Grab you’re favorite guide this month and book a trip with them.  This winter has been rough for the guide community and we know a trip with their favorite clients can help tremendously.  Get outside and put in some river time, you’re soul will thank you.

Middle Falls on the McCloud River Painting by Janet Franco Velez

The point of this post wasn’t intended as a fish report but it was about the famous McCloud River, America’s iconic trout stream.  This time of year as seasons change, more rivers open and become viable opportunities.  This is when we start dreaming about the change in venues.  Currently we are planning excursions for our own adventures.  The Green River float/camp trip, the Owyhee River 6 day upper float and a multi-day whitewater adventure on Oregon’s Illinois River are in the crosshairs.  It also includes floats on the rivers flowing into Lake Shasta as they typically have a short window for being floatable and prime for fishing conditions (click for a closer look at the Upper Sac Float Trip).

Mt. Shasta, from McCloud River Painting by Thomas Hill

One river that never seems to go away is the McCloud.  Imagine what it might have looked like before the dams changed the river forever. Imagine an Alaska type scene being played out, a river teeming with thousands of salmon and steelhead, swimming and spawning in its mint Listerine colored water. Doesn’t that sounds like a special kind of heaven?  We didn’t know the river as it used to be, in fact very few are alive today to share the first hand stories about what the river used to be.  Recently we lost one of our clients and good friend Peter, who shared stories about fishing the McCloud River in the pre-dam era.  Young Peter would take a train up the valley from the city and spend 2 weeks every year exploring the untamed McCloud River canyon with a fly rod.  They would go up and fish the Sacramento River and at Simms they would take a pack train of mules and horses and tote their gear over the mountain into the mysterious waters of the mighty McCloud.  His stories were something out of a dream and they captivated us beyond explanation.  But the sadness in his eyes of watching a wild river shrivel up and change forever was painful.  You could feel the enormous weight of loss as he told his stories about one of the most magical rivers of the world.  Take a minute and watch the video below from CalTrout that shares the story of the McCould River today and what it used to be.  There is currently a big movement to deregulate the laws in place to protect many of our rivers and the clean water that ensures their existence.  When is enough, enough?

 

How Can I Get Involved?

-Join CalTrout and help produce more awareness and protection for our rivers in California like the McCloud River  CalTrout.Org

-Join Trout Unlimited. We currently have a new chapter in Northern California: Shasta Trinity Cascades.  We need your help. TU.org

Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

Trinity River February 2017

Take A Look at the Lower Sacramento River from Keswick Dam to Bend Bridge

The Lower Sacramento River at 45,000cfs

Word of flooding rivers and streams has been blasted across the Northern California region like wildfires in the summer, and this morning brought a rare sight of sunshine.  So we decided to grab the cameras and go for a drive to give you all an idea as to what’s happening on our world famous trout river: The Lower Sacramento River.

The releases from Kesweick Reservoir into the Sacramento River through Redding, CA is scheduled to reach 50,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) later today, and by Sunday it is slated to peak at a massive 70,000 cfs.

The releases from Kesweick Reservoir into the Sacramento River through Redding, CA are scheduled to reach 50,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) later today, and by Sunday it is slated to peak at a massive 70,000 cfs.

At Bend Bridge on the Sacramento River, just miles above Red Bluff, the local community has been battling the threat of flooding and on Tuesday February 7th the river surpassed it's flood stage, breaking the 100,000 cfs mark. Since then the flows have receded a bit, but with more precipitation expected to fall on a drenched canvas, high water possibilities loom on the horizon.

At Bend Bridge on the Sacramento River, just miles above Red Bluff, the local community has been battling the threat of flooding, and on Tuesday February 7th the river surpassed it’s flood stage, breaking the 100,000 cfs mark. Since then the flows have receded a bit, but with more precipitation expected to fall on a drenched canvas and reservoir releases scheduled to nearly double, dangerously high water possibilities loom on the horizon.

We set out south initially crossing the river on the North Street Bridge located above Anderson River Park, a frequented boat ramp.  Chances are that if you have floated the river, putting in at the Posse Grounds above the Sundial Bridge, you took out here.

Stepping out onto the sunny North Street Bridge in Anderson, CA, a bicycle wheel came floating down, warning any passing cyclist to keep your distance.

Stepping out onto the sunny North Street Bridge in Anderson, CA, a bicycle wheel came floating down, warning any passing cyclist to keep your distance.   Just one piece of many that have been washed away by the raging floodwaters.

Hopping onto I-5 heading southbound, toward Red Bluff, we noticed the smaller creeks in the area were still swollen compared to the norm, but given the brief break in storms they ran clean.  Many even showed signs of full remission.  We exited the freeway at Jelly’s Ferry Rd. and headed into the community of Bend, where the river, as expected, was high, muddy, and ran all the way into the trees along the banks.  Even the boat ramp, where recently the flows had exceeded 100,000 cfs, displayed water running in its’ parking lot.  The ramp, usually a long corridor dropping down to the river edge, was covered by the brown waters.

2 locals also came down to inspect the affects of the Sacramento River at the boat ramp under Bend Bridge. Normally there is a 10 foot change in elevation from the top of the ramp to the edge of the river.

2 locals also came down to inspect the affects of the Sacramento River at the boat ramp under Bend Bridge. Normally there is a 10 foot change in elevation from the top of the ramp to the edge of the river.  Just days before, the river had been running through the parking lot.  Mud and sand bars displayed the previous high water mark.

Here is a view of the river looking upstream of Bend Bridge. Notice the water running through the trees along the banks.

Here is a view of the river looking upstream of Bend Bridge. Notice the water running through the trees along the banks.

The road from there consisted of a backroads tour of boat ramps and lookouts headed back into Redding.  Any major tributary to the Sac was similarly high and dirty.

The ramp at Jelly's Ferry Bridge was completely submerged with water all the way up to the trash cans and recycling bins. When this photo was snapped, a beaver angrily slapped his tail, where normally the ground is dry and we would park our trucks and trailers, as if to say,

The ramp at Jelly’s Ferry Bridge was completely submerged with water all the way up to the trash cans and recycling bins. In a spot that is normally dry where we would park or trucks and drift boat trailers, a beaver angrily slapped his tail, as if to warn, “you better not even think about coming out here!”

The Old Mouth of Battle Creek or commonly known as the Barge Hole is normally characterized by a large gravel bar you could drive out to from the right side of this image. There's not a chance in making it out there now as the river has breached the bank on the other side of the river, flooding much of the land of Lake California.

The Old Mouth of Battle Creek or commonly known as the Barge Hole is normally characterized by a large gravel bar you could drive out to from the right side of this image. There’s not a chance in making it out there now as the river has breached the bank on the other side, flooding much of the land of Lake California.  The vehicle access now hides under many feet of water.

Flooding rivers have plagued roadways and communities over the last week in Northern California. This photo shows the road in front of Gover Ranch struggling to keep dry as the waters of Battle Creek rise.

Flooding rivers have plagued roadways and communities over the last week in Northern California. This photo shows the road in front of Gover Ranch struggling to keep dry as the waters of Battle Creek rise.

Just days ago when the river flows were at their highest (so far), the RV Park across from Roosters Landing at the Ball's Ferry Bridge in Cottonwood, CA had river waters flood into it's community displacing many homes. The fish cleaning station is going to need some major repairs now that this tree has become entangled within it.

Just days ago when the river flows were at their highest (so far), the RV Park across from Roosters Landing at the Ball’s Ferry Bridge in Cottonwood, CA had river waters flood into it’s community displacing many homes. The fish cleaning station is going to need some major repairs now that this tree has become entangled within it.

With 45,000cfs coming out of Keswick Dam, the Bonnyview boat ramp shows water close to the top of its' access. Normally there is a steep, lengthy decent to the river from where the river is seen here. With the flows scheduled to see 70,000cfs and possibly more, the parking lot is likely to flood.

With 45,000cfs coming out of Keswick Dam, the Bonnyview boat ramp shows water close to the top of its’ access. Normally there is a steep, lengthy decent to the river from where the river is seen here, and with the flows scheduled to see 70,000cfs and possibly more, the parking lot is likely to flood.

The earth was shaking as Keswick pumped out some massive volumes of water. Can't wait to see what this view looks like when nearly double that is scheduled to be released.

The earth was shaking as Keswick pumped out some massive volumes of water. Can’t wait to see what this view looks like when nearly double that is scheduled to be released.

As we reached the upper reaches of the river the storm clouds moved in and the rain came down, harder and harder as we ultimately reached the Shasta Dam lookout. It doesn't appear that the worst is over, especially since the releases to the Sacramento River from Keswick Dam is slated to reach 70,000 cfs, numbers that the river hasn't seen since the 90's.

As we reached the upper reaches of the river the storm clouds moved in and the rain came down, harder and harder as we ultimately reached the Shasta Dam lookout. It doesn’t appear that the worst is over, especially since the releases to the Sacramento River from Keswick Dam is slated to reach 70,000 cfs, numbers that the river hasn’t seen since the 90’s.

Scheduled Releases out of Keswick Dam near Redding, CA.

-Friday:               50,000 CFS

-Saturday:          60,000 CFS

-Sunday:             70,000CFS!

*Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko has closed the Sacramento River to boating and other recreation due to higher than normal water releases from Shasta and Keswick dams.  The closure does not  apply to lakes and will be rescinded once conditions are safe.  

Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

Is Lake Shasta Going To Overflow?

Unless you live somewhere else other than the West Coast, then you’re fully aware of the recent deluge and so-called “atmospheric river” that has blasted many parts across the western front of the United States.  In the five-year, drought stricken State of California, water is flowing incessantly from every nook and cranny, gushing water into the parched and thirsty landscapes.  It is a welcome reprieve but at the same time is it too much? Can our archaic water systems and infrastructure take it?  Lake Shasta, from water officials, say the reservoir received approximately  73,472,653,908 gallons of water in 24 hours! Yep, that’s billions.

waterflow

Widespread flooding, road closures, mud slides and evacuations have plagued much of the state this week with even talk of many reservoirs overflowing as more water is flowing into them than is physically able to flow out.  Some dams and spillways are going to be able to handle the almost biblical proportions of water coming downstream and some are not.

APTOPIX Damaged Dam

The Oroville Dam Spillway in California is a prime example of a reservoir that is unable to release enough water to accommodate the amount of water coming in. This week, due to the outdated infrastructure, the spillway flowing out of Lake Oroville and into the Feather River has failed and will probably be completely eroded in the next few days. Time will tell.  There is an emergency spillway but there is no concrete and it’s never been used, so officials are only guessing what the outcome will be.

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The image on the right shows the damage done to the spillway after the hole was noticed and flows were sent down to test the spillway.  As you can see the hole is massive and is eroding under and the sides of the spillway.  Although we have no hard facts to back up this was actually 2013 but it looks like there were known issues with the spillway previous to the recent damage.  Hindsight is always 20/20.  There is going to be a lot of finger-pointing going on but lets just hope the damage downstream in minimized for all involved.

The newscast below goes over more details on the Oroville Dam situation regarding the damaged spillway and emergency spillway that possibly will be used to mitigate and direct overflowing water away from the dam if needed.  What is going to happen to the people, infrastructure and ecosystems below?

emergencyspillway

A great glimpse of what is going on for those not familiar with the Oroville Dam Spillway situation. The latest news briefings say that they may not have to use emergency spillway if rain stops and increasing water from the power plant which has been running below it maximum output.

 

In the next video notice the fresh clearing of trees and brush on the top of the emergency spillway path.  This will give you a better real-time aerial look at the current damn dam ( or rather spillway) situation.

Lake Shasta

Now that we’ve taken a look at Oroville lets take a look at whats going up at Shasta Lake.  We are going to start this one off with a look back in the 1970’s when Shasta Lake filled up and came over the top.

“This is archival footage from KIXE from I believe the Spring of 1978 (or was it 1979?) when Shasta Lake overflowed the dam after the infamous 1976-1977 drought. At the time experts had said Shasta Lake could never recover in just one year, but it did.”

You gotta love the music and over feeling to this oldie.  This is an absolute classic! Sit back and enjoy!

Early this morning the lake passed the 10′ foot to the top mark on Shasta Dam.  Between midnight of Feb 8th and midnight of Feb 9th, the lake shot up 10′ and it continues to steadily climb about a 1/4 of a foot an hour for the past several hours. Some interesting facts from the previous storm(s) near Lake Shasta:

– Highest inflow this season was recorded was midnight last night at the rate of 171,700 CFS (1,284,405 gallons per second)!

– 10′ Increase between 00:00 02/08 and 00:00 02/09 at an increase of 225,479 acre feet of water (73,472,653,908 gallons of water in 24 hours)!

– The last time we were at this level was June 2, 2012  (Came within
2.5 feet from full pool in 2012)

– McCloud location has received 19.12″ of rain month to date, 47.26″ year to date.

It’s unlikely that Lake Shasta will overflow in the next few days but the future will be in the hands of Mother Nature and the amount of precipitation we receive after this event. Commencing today, the Bureau of Reclamation will start ramping up flows out of the dam in order to make room for the incoming flows.  Unlike Lake Oroville, Shasta Dam was designed to overflow due to the excessive amounts of rainfall the area above the dam can receive in wet years.  If you have ever experienced one of these events you know how impressive they can be. The releases from Shasta into Keswick and into the Lower Sacramento River will jump to 50K cubic feet per second today, 60K by Saturday and  70K by Sunday. This is in order to meet the regulations for flood control and allow more water to go out than is coming in and keep Lake Shasta from overflowing while also giving flood protection from below Shasta and Keswick Dams.

Scheduled Releases out of Keswick Dam near Redding, CA.

-Friday:               50,000 CFS

-Saturday:          60,000 CFS

-Sunday:             70,000CFS

What do you think? Will Lake Shasta Overflow?

…………………………………..

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A current look at reservoir conditions for the State of California. There is more blue than we have seen in a long time!

SACRAMENTO RIVER NEWS

*Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko has closed the Sacramento River to boating and other recreation  due to higher than normal water releases from Shasta and Keswick dams. The closure does not  apply to lakes and will be rescinded once conditions are safe.  

 

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Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

Lower Sacramento River Goes Huge!

After a five year drought for much of the West, we have finally received copious amounts of precipitation in Northern California. Is it time to start building an ark? Perhaps. We have been getting hammered with more water than we know what to do with.  The reservoirs are filling faster then they can let water out.  So in order to meet flood space regulatory requirements in Shasta Lake, flow releases will be increasing to extraordinary high levels.

keswick-dam

*These flows will make the Lower Sacramento River below Keswick Dam through Redding to to the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta extremely dangerous!!*

“People recreating in or along the lower American River downstream of Folsom Dam to the confluence of the American and Sacramento rivers can expect river levels to increase and should take appropriate safety precautions,” the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said in a news release.

Releases to the Sacramento River have ranged from approximately 3,300 cfs (DWR, 2011) during drought periods and 79,000 cfs during flood events (DWR,1974) so this a major event we have not seen too often.

The Bureau of Reclamation has scheduled flow increases ramping up from today, February 9th, through this Sunday.

Scheduled Releases out of Keswick Dam near Redding, CA.

-Friday:               50,000 CFS

-Saturday:          60,000 CFS

-Sunday:             70,000CFS!

 

*Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko has closed the Sacramento River to boating and other recreation due to higher than normal water releases from Shasta and Keswick dams.  The closure does not  apply to lakes and will be rescinded once conditions are safe.  

Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

State of Jefferson Steelhead and Trout Outlook

We hope everybody had a safe holidays and enjoyed Christmas and the seasons celebrations.  Maybe some received new fly fishing gear or had the chance to wet a line.  We didn’t fish for a few days but spent our time with family and friends in a well needed break from the winter season.  But just as quickly as it started it has come to an end and we creep into the wee hours of 2016.  So whats happening and what does the near future look like?  It’s looking pretty good overall and the break in heavy precipitation has brought many rivers into or close to go time.  Here is a quick peek:

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Light rain and high elevation snow is expected across our northern counties today, including Del Norte, Humboldt, and northern Trinity counties. Other than being mildly inconvenient for outdoor activities, minimal impacts are expected. Dry weather is expected Wednesday and Thursday.

 Lower Sacramento River

Our staple river for guide trips and life source for the state of California overall has been fishing well as we transfer into the winter season.  The major change as detailed in the graph below occurred on December 20th by doubling the flows overnight from about 5,000 to 10,000 CFS.  The biggest obstacle for these flows is going to be for wade anglers.  Not only does this highly limit the areas accessible via wading boot but it poses a serious threat if you were to fall in.  There are still some wade spots available but use caution.

keswick_dec27_2016

Notice the flow increase on the 20th and then notice the stable flows.  The Lower Sac is always a good bet this time of year and is best approached with a drift boat at these flows.

Eggs, alevins and small mayfly patterns have produced the best in the last few weeks.  If you don’t feel like braving the higher flows this is a great time to use your favorite guide with a drift boat as these next few months are some of the best and lightest in traffic.  Need a guide? We can help.

img_4737

Shannon’s first day in a drift boat and fly fishing stayed into the fish all day!

The Coast

Although some rivers have remained high and off color there are some sections falling into shape in both Oregon and California.  These next storms don’t look like much at this point but keep an eye out as forecasts become more detailed.  There looks to be some good to excellent fishing conditions for some of the rivers in the State of Jefferson.  Take a look at the Smith River below:

The Smith River is typically the first to provide fishable conditions and right now she is looking pretty good!

The Smith River is typically the first to provide fishable conditions and right now she is looking pretty good!  Have you ever visited the Smith in the winter?  You should, its magical.

Although the next storms don’t look like they are going to bring much in precipitation at this point but definitely be prepared for cold conditions.  Always bring an extra change of clothes and have a way to warm up in case of a spill.   Also be careful on the roadways as cooler conditions like this also create black ice, which the only way to combat is by driving way slower than normal.

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Reservoir Storage Compared to Last Year

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Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

December storms bring in the Chrome

If April showers bring May flowers then December storms bring sea-run steelhead home! Currently a heavy “pineapple express” weather system is lowering its crosshairs into Northern California and bringing heavy precipitation and deep snow over the upper elevations. Look for high and off color conditions in most of the rivers also with some roadways being closed or with major delays throughout and after the system. Although this new front will blow out most of our rivers for steelhead, minus perhaps the very upper reaches, there is good news. The severe storm fronts that blast the State of Jefferson bring in fresh fish from the ocean and allows fish already in the river system to get up into the tributaries and spawn safely. After five years of drought this is just what we needed. And although it’s not the best for fishing this week it may prove to make the New Year and without question years to come successful for steelhead and other anadromous friends.

giant steelhead and smiling angler

This is what December storms can equate to come Jan/Feb/Mar and this is what chrome looks like. Michael Mcgahan captured this amazing shot of shots last year of elated Marty Welsh and this spectacular shiny specimen. Does he look excited or what? Do you know what those marks are on the fish between the dorsal and adipose fin?

So what is happening with the weather? We find ourselves explaining the situation via e-mail, text, phone and social media outlets. As much as our job requires us to be on top of the weather it’s better left up to the professionals. Here is a short video clip with some diagrams explaining the basics of the storm system that is slamming Nor Cal through the week and possibly into the weekend.

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One road condition which has plagued us most of the last several weeks has been the rockslide on Hwy 299 west of Weaverville and just east of Del Loma on the Trinity River. Known as the Big French Creek slide this area is highly unstable and doesn’t look to improve anytime soon. Currently it is closed and will be at least into next week. Although one lane traffic may commence eventually, until this mountainside is stabilized it will be a reoccurring event like many slides on Hwy 299 have been in the past. Plan ahead and ensure enough time to go the long way around.

Look for Hwy 299 to be closed at the area indicated on the map. Travelers are urged to take other ways around and avoid Hwy 299 until the mountainside stabilizes and debris is removed. Highway 3 is the closest detour but can be treacherous in wet and snowy conditions so plan for extra travel time.

Look for Hwy 299 to be closed at the area indicated on the map. Travelers are urged to take other ways around and avoid Hwy 299 until the mountainside stabilizes and debris is removed. Highway 3 is the closest detour but can be treacherous in wet and snowy conditions so plan for extra travel time.

shasta-lenticular-clouds

A monster of a storm is about to come out from under the bed and tackle 14,172′ Mt. Shasta. The weather service is calling for 58-80″ of snow for Mt. Shasta in the next 3 days. This year has been a banner one compared to the last five with a 176% of average precipitation to date (17.5″).

Our hope is always to write more and share more photos detailing our adventures but as usual we find ourselves utterly buried in working the river and enjoying its critters. We would like to thank all the people who made this past fall season and the ones previous unforgettable. We are truly blessed and constantly amazed to be surrounded by such great people, from our families, friends, clients, anglers, fellow guides, co-workers and everybody else behind the scenes. The fishing family here in Northern California is truly special and our life would not be nearly as enjoyable as it is without the faces behind it. You make it possible and we are grateful. Sending the best wishes to all those who make the river flow.

 

 

Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com

 

Why Do Rivers Bend?

Here is one of the many questions that come up while guiding clients on the river.  Why don’t rivers run straight, why do they bend?
So what causes a river to bend in the first place? In a nutshell, all it takes is a little disturbance from a plethora of variables and a whole heck of a lot of time.  We can write a bunch pages and give plenty of reasons but this short three minute animation encapsulates the basics and gives some concrete and easily understood facts on why rivers bend.



Below: A classic example of river meandering through the valley and around mountains.
river meandering


Below: Diagram of a meandering river and associated landforms.meandering_diagram


Fish Kennedy Brothers

Northern California Fly Fishing Guides

www.FishKennedyBrothers.com