The One That Got Away From Chuck

Every so often in the fly fishing game you come across a particular fish or run that will haunt you. The haunting often comes because the fish can’t be caught or because maybe you’ve managed to trick the fish into eating your fly only to have it break you off or throw the hook.  Either way, the proverbial fish that got away keeps you coming back if it doesn’t drive you crazy first.  One of our good friends Chuck has a particular run he likes to fish at a particular time. There is one fish that has eluded Chuck many times so he comes to visit his fish for about a week straight and studies him as he begins to slurp down caddis in the surface film when the the sun leaves the water.  It’s a love affair that has grown over the years and as Chuck has become a proficient angler, the fish in this run to say the least have become very savvy to any angler attempting to even get close.  The fish that resides on the far bank is not the biggest in the river but because of the location in the current it is a very difficult spot to get a good dead drift.  With a dry fly it requires getting the fly at least 10 to 15 feet upstream with a series of perfect mends and line feeds while also allowing the fly to drift well past the target before being picked up.  One bad cast or missed mend and the fish usually go down and its worthwhile to pick and move to another location .  Typically, like pictured below after a good presentation one of the unseen rainbow minions grab the offering which offer a consolation prize but also spooks the run and put the wiser fish down.

trout in hand rod in mouth

Meet Chuck, and the fish he wasn’t going for although Chuck is delighted with anything pulling on the other end of the line. Chuck enjoys the pursuit and everybody involved loves the Chucky factor.

 

One evening Chuck was making crisp casts and presenting the fly cleanly to the far bank with impeccable precision.  As Chuck took his time watching the rhythm of the rises we took some video knowing it was finally going to happen.  Chuck took 3 or 4 minions from the edges and patiently waited for the nose he was hunting to show back up while letting the run rest and watching the insects drift down the far seam. After numerous attempts we started running out of storage on the memory card and it appeared that Chuck was going to have to come back tomorrow and try his hand at another river poker game.  With the camera off of course Chuck’s next cast just like the one before that and the one before hit the target and drifted flawlessly into the impossible seam.  Boom! Fish on! Watch what happens next….

 

 

Fish Kennedy Brothers

Professional Fly Fishing Guides

Northern California Trout and Steelhead

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“The Great Release”

Sometimes while chasing steelhead you may feel like you are on a wild goose chase.  Have you been there?  Do you know the feeling?  If you have been involved, or have chased anadromous fish, I bet you do.  You may even be infected by it.  Perhaps you are terminal, or have a serious diagnosis.   You’ve searched up high, and you’ve search way down low.  And every little, riddled and latent crack between, and well beyond the dark depths and twinkling fringes.  It drives some anglers to a point of Continue reading

How to Kill Trout Quickly on the Fly

Trout Dying To Get a Good Photo

We all should know the rules for releasing a trout with the best chance of survival, but there is one rule that is almost never included in articles about successful releasing.

So, you have landed the fish as quickly as possible to limit capture stress and you are about to pick up the fish and a get a few ‘grip and grin’ shots before release.

But, grip and grin, can all too often turn into grip and kill, and it is all down to where and how you grip the trout that can determine its survival.

Bish and Fish go over basics to hold trout and ensure proper catch and release techniques.

Bish and Fish go over basics to hold trout and ensure proper catch and release techniques.

Have look at the anatomical drawing above showing the main internal structure and components of a trout. Take particular notice where the heart is (red outline) – between and under the gills and liver, just above the Pectoral fins.

These three organs, heart, gills and liver are very susceptible to damage, although not always immediately obvious, unless the damage is very severe leading to immediate death. A fish subject to external pressure to the heart and other organs may swim away on release, but many die soon after.

Gripping a fish in the pectoral area using inward force and squeezing pressure will compress the heart and maybe the liver and gills. The outcome for the fish is not going to be good, even if it does manage to swim away on release.

Click here to read more of the article from Bishfish.

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Catch and Release

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